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Delphin

A more creative approach to repetitive typography than the Sterling bag featured elsewhere in this gallery. This one repeats the words "Sickness bag", "Spuckbeutel" and "Sac vomitoire" ad nauseam, giving the visual impression of verbal diarrhoea. The purple rubber stamp in the middle is from the "MS Delphin". Don't know where this cruise ship operates, but it's nice to know that it provides an alternative to spewing over the side.

See Generic Kard-o-Pak for a very similar bag. 

Thanks to Jürgen Klein. (1999)

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DFDS Seaways

Looks like the Scandinavian Seaways bag below, but both the bag and the boat have been renamed.

Thanks to Mark Brace. (2001) 

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DFDS Seaways (broad stripe above)

In case you missed it, the broad stripe is on the reverse.

Thanks to Mark Brace. (2004)

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DFDS Seaways (horizontal crimping)

The crimping is the pressure marks from the machine where the pointy base has been glued together.

Thanks to Nico Snels (2005)

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DFDS Seaways (vertical crimping)

This one must have gone in the machine sideways.

Thanks to Nico Snels (2005)

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Dramamine

No, the motion-sickness medication has not started running ferries (though that might be a way to boost sales). They do sponsor bags, though. This one came from a ferry from the Venezuelan mainland to the Caribbean island of Margarita.

Thanks to Paul Gonçalves (2005)

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Euroferries

Sometimes the instructions are well worth the price of the bag. "Once been used, close by the dotted line and auto-stick on the adhesive after having removed the protective paper. Open the bottom fold to get a bag with a higher stability and better form."

Same as Iberworld, come to think of it.

But which dotted line? (there are three). And should you be concerned about the stability and form of the bag before or after you've puked in it?

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